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Health and Social Care Committee - debate on community pharmacy report

For information, it is anticipated that the Plenary debate on the Health and Social Care Committee’s Report on the contribution of community pharmacy to health services in Wales <http://www.senedd.assemblywales.org/documents/s7885/The%20contribution%20of%20community%20pharmacy%20to%20health%20services%20in%20Wales%20Report%20-%20May%202012.pdf> will take place on Wednesday 11 July 2012.

This information was published in yesterday’s Business Statement and Announcement <http://www.assemblywales.org/bus-home/bus-chamber-fourth-assembly-business-statement.htm?act=dis&amp;id=235258&amp;ds=6/2012> . The Government’s response to the Report is expected to be laid by Wednesday 4 July.

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Y Pwyllgor Iechyd a Gofal Cymdeithasol - dadl ar yr adroddiad ar fferylliaeth gymunedol

/ Health and Social Care Committee - debate on community pharmacy report

Er eich gwybodaeth fe ddisgwylir i’r ddadl ar Adroddiad y Pwyllgor Iechyd a Gofal Cymdeithasol ar gyfraniad fferylliaeth gymunedol i wasnaethau iechyd yng Nghymru <http://www.senedd.cynulliadcymru.org/documents/s7885/Y%20cyfraniad%20a%20wneir%20gan%20fferylliaeth%20gymunedol%20i%20wasanaethau%20iechyd%20yng%20Nghymru%20-%20Adroddiad%20-%20Mai%202012.pdf> gael ei chynnal yn ystod y Cyfarfod Llawn ar ddydd Mercher 11 Gorffennaf 2012.

Cyhoeddwyd y wybodaeth hon yn y Datganiad a Chyhoeddiad Busnes <http://www.assemblywales.org/cy/bus-home/bus-chamber-fourth-assembly-business-statement.htm?act=dis&amp;id=235258&amp;ds=6/2012> ddoe. Disgwylir i ymateb y Llywodraeth gael ei gosod erbyn dydd Mercher 4 Gorffennaf.

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Co-operative models of care for older people PDF report

A full 25 page print-quality PDF can be dowloaded HERE (1.5MB)

The Quebec experience

1997-2012
Jean-Pierre Girard M.A. B.Sc. B.A.

and

The wider Canadian
experience

John Restakis M.A. B.A.

Executive Director,
British Columbia Cooperative Association

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Wales Progressive Co-operators - Activities to date

(download as print-quaity PDF 244 KB)

WPC is currently working in close partnership with Cartrefi Cymru, the national third sector social care agency, on a long-term strategic programme of activities aimed particularly at identifying and promoting co-operative solutions to the challenges of social care in Wales. For activities to date go to:

• A Study Day in Caerphilly in 2010 (under the auspices of WCVA’s Network 3) which brought together the co-operative movement and the social care third sector for the first time, resulting in the report “Shaping the Future of Care”.
• A PSMW seminar in Cardiff in 2011 (in partnership with Public Service Management Wales) in which the international co-operative specialist Robin Murray spoke about the ideas in his book “Co-operation in the Age of Google”.
• A seminar in Abercwmboi in 2011 (in partnership with Interlink RCT and VAMT) which brought together a range of speakers about co-operation and social care, leading to an application for funding for a disability employment co-operative in RCT which is still proceeding.
• Submission of detailed evidence in 2011 and 2012 to the National Assembly Health and Social Care Committee Inquiry into Residential Care, including the commissioning of separate evidence from Canadian Co-operative Care specialists – Jean-Pierre Girard and John Restakis, especially related to the multi-stakeholder model.
• A visit to Wales in February 2012 by Jean-Pierre Girard to share knowledge of the home care co-operatives in Quebec to Welsh Ministers, the H&SC Committee and grassroots activities.
• A seminar in May 2012 which brought together members of the co-operative movement, central and local government, the third sector and citizens, to identify a way forward for the nurturing of co-operative care options in Wales. This seminar has particularly informed a detailed WPC response to the Social Services (Wales) Bill.
• Detailed planning for a visit in June 2012 of the leading Canadian co-operative expert John Restakis to speak to Ministers and AMs, the PSMW summer school, the joint conference of WACDS and WCVA’s Network 3, the ADSS Cymru conference, and grassroots meetings in Newport, Cardiff, Neath/Port Talbot and Conwy.
• Adrian Roper, Chief Executive of Cartrefi Cymru will be presenting on our social care work at the Co-operative Membership/IWA conference on Friday 6th July – see detail on this web site.
• Various articles have been written to increase public awareness and understanding of what is distinctive about the contribution of the Co-operative movement, and in particular the multi- stakeholder co-operative model, is well under way and can be found on this web site.
• A co-operative response to the forthcoming Welsh Government consultation on Citizen Directed Support and the preparation of evidence for the passage of the Social Services (Wales) Bill is well under way and informed by public participation.

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Are we in danger of losing the language of Co-operation?

(download as print quality PDF 111KB)
To bring about the transformation of ‘Social Services’ policy and legislation, the language we use, and the definition of concepts to empower require particular attention.

We observed in conversations and responses to the recent draft Social Services (Wales) Bill 2012 consultation, a lack of familiarity with the meaning of different service models.

A variety of models offer to achieve the reform of the social care system and are claimed to achieve ‘co-production’. However, their governance arrangements require particular scrutiny if they are to deliver improved quality services.

We must therefore be wary of using terms such as ‘co-operatives’, ‘mutuals’ and ‘social enterprises’. They are not interchangeable concepts as we explained in our response to the above consultation. Without precise definition words can easily become all things to all people and just another slogan.

Historically, co-operatives have at least three roots – consumer, producer and worker co-operatives. Now, we can add Credit Unions and significantly the multi stakeholder co-operative model. There may be others?

The consumer model is a familiar presence on the High Street in retail societies, The Co-operative Group being a national example with an annual turnover of £14bn. The key point is members own this consumer organisation, and join for £1, with member and community benefits and opportunity for democratic engagement.

Mondragon is a Spanish example of a worker co-operative owned and controlled by its “workers manual administrative and technical of both sexes’” who have invested in their own business to make it work. Robert Oakeshott is excellent at explaining ‘The Case for Workers’ Co-ops’ (1990).

Producer co-ops are a separate model reflecting the vital role of co-ops in agriculture. Producers, although they may own their co-op, are not formally employed by it. Their relationship to their co-op is very different operationally, from the relationship of workers-owners to their worker co-op, as in Tower Colliery.

A further distinction recognises the other key co-op structure as applied to financial services are credit unions.

Although often cited, the John Lewis Partnership is not a worker co-operative. It’s workers are just that, partners in the business.

With Welsh Government focusing upon ‘citizen centred service’ delivery, and early intervention, the multi stakeholder model is better placed to sustainably meet the needs of service users thorough engaging the service user, worker and wider community interests in service planning and delivery.

The success of the Quebec model was revealed in research commissioned by the Wales Progressive Co-operators for the Assembly Health and Social Care committee’s current Residential inquiry. Significantly, it provided further evidence that there are other choices to the private and public sector mix, but it requires people who wish to contribute to their own health and wellbeing.

This model has the greatest possibilities for transforming the relationship between the service user – as an owner and member and the organisation providing care. But it is not the only model. Nor is it suggested that frail older people must be active members. Clearly, informal carers, community and co-operative movement supporters can help ensure effective governance.

In our view, this provides in a substantive form what we think ‘co-production’ actually means, with local co-operative businesses owned and run by and for their members.

There are distinct differences between mutuals, co-operatives and social enterprises. Direct accountability isn’t an essential characteristic of social enterprises, compared with the formal accountability of co-operatives. In Wales, some small successful, relevant care models are being swallowed up by venture capitalists – an eventuality that co-operatives have learnt to protect themselves from through their constitution.


The Westminster government misuses the term mutual with the loosest of interpretations. Their Health Department has announced the investment of £19m over the next year for social enterprise to support frontline staff to run services that provide what they think their local population really need. http://www.networks.nhs.uk/networks/news/social-enterprises-to-receive-ps19-million-investment-over-next-year-announced Is this privatisation being dressed up as ‘mutualism’?


The power of the multi stakeholder model is that it also serves the purpose of strengthening social work with social workers playing a role alongside people. People have their own answers to their problems. It is about how and what people working together wish to achieve – not thrusting things on people.

Social care people talk the same language as co-operators, with empowered service users and valued frontline staff. Good small-scale models of co-operative social care exist. Can they be scaled up in Wales?

David Smith and Hilda Smith
Wales Progressive Co-operators

Details of a Canadian social care expert visit to Wales 26-29th June can be found at http://progressive-cooperators.org.uk/wales-group

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Funding public spending in Wales - London meeting

from the Bevan Foundation Members' Bulletin, 1 June 2012

www.bevanfoundation.org for more information and Membership

Book now: Prof Gerald Holtham, Chair of the Welsh Government's Independent Commission on Funding and Finance for Wales, discusses the options for funding public spending in Wales with Owen Smith MP, Shadow Secretary of State for Wales on 25th June in Committee Room 20, Upper Committee Corridor, St. Stephen's Entrance, Palace of Westminster, London, from 5.30 for a 6pm start. Its free so Book your place now <http://fundinginwales.eventbrite.com/>

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International Co-operatives Day on 7 July 2012

1. Core text

Celebrating International Co-operatives Day on 7 July

International Co-operatives Day on 7 July is a day of global co-operative action. Around the world people will be celebrating how co-operatives are building a better world, making a difference to people’s lives everywhere.

A global movement of 1.4 million businesses and 1 billion people are already celebrating the United Nations International Year of Co-operatives. 7 July will be ahigh point, a day of shared action in this unique year.

2. News story/release text

International Co-operatives Day on 7 July is a day of global co-operative action. Around the world people will be celebrating how co-operatives are building a better world, making a difference to people’s lives everywhere.

A global movement of 1.4 million businesses and around 1 billion people are already celebrating the International Year of Co-operatives. 7 July will be ahigh point, a day of shared action in this unique year.

To celebrate International Co-operatives Day, [name of organisation] will be [xxxxxxxxxxx].

[Name of co-operative] joins co-operatives across theUKin celebrating on 7 July.

From family fun days to food tastings, in-store activities to on-line social media campaigns, co-operatives large and small will be taking part in the day of co-operative celebration and shared action.

Ed Mayo, Secretary General of Co-operatives UK, the trade association for co-operative enterprises, says:

“We are in the middle of the International Year of Co-operatives, a year when co-operatives across the world will be lifting the lid on how they build a better world. 7 July is International Co-operatives Day, when co-operatives in this country will unite with those fromChinatoChilein celebrating their contribution to a more ethical economy.”

3. Facebook entries

We’re celebrating International Co-operatives Day on 7 July

International Co-operatives Day on 7 July is a day of global co-operative action. Around the world people will be celebrating how co-operatives are building a better world, making a difference to people’s lives everywhere.

We’ll be joining with co-operatives across theUKand the world, celebrating by [details of plans, celebrations etc].

We’re celebrating International Co-operatives Day on 7 July

International Co-operatives Day on 7 July is a day of global co-operative action. A global movement of 1.4 million businesses and 1 billion people are already celebrating the United Nations International Year of Co-operatives. 7 July will be ahigh point, a day of shared action in this unique year.

4. Slogans

A day of global co-operative action

A day of co-operation, shared action and celebration

Celebrate International Co-operatives Day on 7 July

Celebrate how co-operatives build a better world on 7 July

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Page 5 of 7

Hilda Smith, feminist and co-operator

Hilda Smith, MBE - ‘To hope, to dare and do’.

Hilda Smith, a distinguished feminist and co-operator, died recently aged 94. Born and raised in Burnley, she started work at 14 earning six shillings a week in a sewing factory.

Active in the feminist, co-operative and labour movements for over 50 years, her relentless commitment to social and gender equality stands out as an example of selfless commitment to the wellbeing and welfare of others. Hilda constantly fought for the things that she believed in, she was practically minded, compassionate and stoical in her determination.

Hilda started her political career in 1958 serving her apprenticeship in Woking Co-operative Womens Guild. In 1963 she was elected to the Political Purposes Committee of the influential Royal Arsenal Co-operative Society (RACS), becoming its first and only female chair within a short space of time. RACS was the only Society directly affiliated to the Labour Party. She used her influence to ensure that the voice of ordinary women and their families was heard by the Labour Party and Government, with easy access to Labour Ministers and Prime Minsters.

For Hilda, the 'personal was the political'. As a women who entered formal education in her mid forties, Hilda knew from experience that access to social, educational and economic opportunities was a key issue. She worked alongside prominent women MPs and trade union leaders on the National Joint Committee of Working Women (NJC), to bring about the introduction of the Equal Pay Act in 1970, the Sex Discrimination Act in 1975, and the formation of the Equal Opportunities Commission, who took steps to bring this to the fore.

As a patient in a TB sanatorium from 1947 to 1950, Hilda understood the importance of preventive health. She contributed extensively on health policy issues and chaired an NJC national working group which produced a comprehensive ‘Health Care for Women’ policy document (1977), (Virago). As a former nurse and as a social worker, Hilda contributed extensively to the NJC’s evidence to Government inquiries. including the Seebohm Committee (1969), the Finer Commission on Single Parent Families (1974), and the NHS Royal Commission (1979). She championed new and neglected issues and, in 1982, authored an NJC food policy statement which recommended developing a Government policy on food and nutrition to build a national approach to healthy eating. .

Throughout, she was never concerned with courting popularity. In 1981, against wider conventional opinion she supported a National Minimum Wage campaign because she knew this would help millions of women.

In 1990 she received a Shadow Ministry for Women award for “her lifetime, particularly within the Co-operative Movement, fighting for equality for women and for their full representation at all levels of the Labour Movement”.

Her meticulously-kept NJC papers and encouragement led Labour historian Christine Collette to take a fresh look in her book, the ‘Newer Eve’, at what was called the ‘second wave of feminism'.

On retiring to Wales, Hilda continued her work as Health Convenor for the Fawcett Society. She was very active for another 26 years and was awarded an MBE in the 2013 Honours List for “services to frail and vulnerable people”.

It is hard to measure the impact of Hilda Smith upon the way in which we have become committed to equality over the last 40 years. Her quiet determination and relentless passion helped to improve the lives of many people who will never know her name or understand her contribution. She lived life with purpose and with passion to deliver a greater vision of a fair and just society, and helped to make this world a better place.

David Smith

Hilda is survived by her sons Peter and myself, three grandchildren and nine grandchildren

Hilda Smith, born 10 February 1919, died 27 March 2013

 

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